Hartblei Superrotator

Проблема с Hartblei 45/3.5 Super-Rotator

#1 nikandr

Здравствуйте, уважаемые форумчане.

Сегодня я получил, заказанный в www.harblei.com, объектив
Hartblei 45/3.5 Super-Rotator c байонетом Pentax 645
(http://www.hartblei. s/lens_45mm.htm)
и сразу наткнулся на проблему

При попытке установки на тушку Pentax 645NII,
выяснилось, что объектив не защелкивается до конца,
то есть в байонет он, в принципе, входит и даже поворачивается
там, но окончательного характерного щелчка, после
которого объектив должен жестко зафиксироваться не
происходит. Объектив просто “упирается” и дальше
не поворачивается (силу, естественно, не прикладывал).

После внимательного осмотра изделия Киевских кудесников
со стороны байонета и сравнения его с Pentax 645FA 74/2.8
у меня появилось подозрение, что виноват стопорный винт,
который расположен перпендикулярно к кольцу байонета,
рядом с прорезью в которую входит “язычок”, защелкивающий
объектив. Этот винт на Hartble выступает на большую длину
чем на родном Pentax-овском объективе, к тому же на Hartblei
есть еще один винт, расположенный рядом, которого на родном нет.

Если мое предположение верно, то есть смысл попробовать
заменить стопорный винт на более мелкий (вкрутить не получится, так
как на вид там нет запаса хода резьбы), но, честно говоря,
сам этим заниматься боюсь, так как нет ни опыта соотвествующего,
ни инструмента.

Отправлять объектив обратно на Украину я собираюсь только
если не получится отремонтировать его в Москве, так как
доставку я ждал месяц и не хочу ждать еще неизвестно
сколько времени на туда-в ремонт-обратно.

В общем, посоветуйте, пожалуйста, куда в Москве лучше обратиться
с этой проблемой, мне из подобного рода мест известны:

– Сивма на Водном стадионе (обращался туда с довольно похожей
проблемой с Токиной под Nikon-овский байонет, профессионально и
быстро помогли)

– Фотофрейм на Мосфильмовской

Кто из вас обращался в эти фирмы (или в другие) по вопросам ремонта
СФ Пентаксов и оптики к ним? Какие отзывы и впечатления?
Буду благодарен за любые советы и комментарии.

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Hartblei Superrotator

The problem withcommon wisdom, is that it’s often too common and rarely wise enough. One bit of so called common wisdom has been that Soviet made cameras and lenses were cheap and poorly made. Since I’ve had little exposure to such products, over the years I have simply taken such comments at face value. The odd Zenit occasionally seen on the second-hand shelves at camera shops did nothing to refute this perception.

But that was then and this is now, (to coin a phrase). I’m here to tell you about the latest addition to my medium format lens arsenal, theHartblei 45mm f/3.5 Super-Rotator, and in addition to singing its praises, to soundly affirm its many strengths.


Fig. 1
Log and Surf. Salt Point, CA. November, 2003

Contax 645 with Hartblei 45mm f/3.5 f.3.5 Super-Rotator lens
and Kodak DCS Pro Back at ISO 100

What is it Exactly, and Where Does it Come From?

Hartbleiis a Ukrainian lens manufacturer which sells its products around the world directly over the Internet rather than through traditional distributors and retailers. Apparently many of their designs were derived from Zeiss in post-war East Germany. What I’ve read is that Hartblei obtains its glass from Russia and does its own multi-coating, mechanical designs, optical mounting, and alignment.

Of the many lenses that this company makes my experience is limited to theHartblei 45mm f/3.5 Super-Rotator. While other lenses from this company may equal or even exceed this one (unlikely, since this is the top of their range), I have no experience or knowledge about them. So, please don’t write to ask me what I think of lens X or Y. I simply don’t know.

TheSuper-Rotatoris unique in the world of 645 medium format lenses. It is a medium wide angle (in 645 format terms) that offers full tilt and shift movements. It is available in fixed mount versions to fit Mamiya 645, Pentax 645 and Contax 645 cameras.

NB:This lens is also available in aPentacon 6mount with adaptors for 645 cameras as well as various 35mm cameras. I have no experience with these — only with the fixed mount version for the Contax 645, and by inference the two other fixed 645 mounts available.

While the lens is available in fixed mounts for these three autofocus cameras, it does not autofocus. It also does not have an autodiaphram or meter coupling. In other words, it mounts on the camera like any other lens, but you need to meter using an external hand-held light meter and then set the aperture and shutter speed manually. (Depending on the camera you may also be able to do manual “match-needle” meteringat shooting aperture). The diaphragm is also not pre-set, so it means that you have to focus with the lens wide open and then manually shut it down to the chosen shooting aperture before making an exposure. Sort of like working with a view camera, which is not an inappropriate comparison, since like with a view camera you have shifts for perspective control and swings (tilts) for the Scheimflug effect. (More on this further on).


Fig. 2
Barren Trees. Point Reyes, CA. November, 2003

Contax 645 with Hartblei 45mm f/3.5 f.3.5 Super-Rotator lens
and Kodak DCS Pro Back at ISO 100

Composited in Photoshop CS using Photomerge, from two frames — one shifted left and one shifted right.

What’s The Competition?

In a word or three – there isn’t any. In the 35 mm world Canon has three tilt/shift lenses; a 24mm, 45mm and a 90mm. These sell for a bit over $1,000 each and provide basic movements on two axis. The lenses come preset from the factory with the axes opposite each other, but a Canon service center can adjust them so that they are on the same axis. This way you can use Scheimfluganda rising front (for example) at the same time. I have found these lenses to be an invaluable part of my lens 35mm arsenal and indeed their availability was one of the reasons that I switched to Canon from Nikon in the mid-1990’s. (Nikon has an 85mm f/2.8 T/S lens, but I regard it as being of limited appeal for landscape and architectural work because of its focal length).

No other current 35mm lens maker offers tiltandshift lenses for 35mm cameras. One can use bellows attachments with short focus lenses for some macro work, but these have limited applicability for most photographers.

In the medium format world the situation is similar. Until recently Hasselblad had theArcbody, but unfortunately it was discontinued in 2001. It took proprietary Rodenstock lenses (three were available) and it accepted most standard Hasselblad viewfinders and film backs.

Hasselblad still sells theFlexBody,which offers limited movements withsomeHasselblad mount lenses. The problem here is that few lenses project a large enough image circle for this to provide a practical solution for field use.

Fuji offers theGX 680, the only medium format camera designed to offer basic lens movements, due to its built in bellows. It’s a great system, but more appropriate for studio rather that field use.

Finally, Rollei used to offer a tilt/shift lens for its6008series cameras. I always was intrigued, and wished I’d had one during the years that I owned a 6008 system, but the price was daunting, and the lens itself was the size of a baby’s head.

Otherwise, for the popular Mamiya 645, Pentax 645 and Contax 645 systems there isn’t a perspective control lens to be had, and this is where theHartblei 45mm f/3.5 Super-Rotatorcomes in.

I used to do a lot of large format photography, both commercially and for fine-art landscape work. I even used to teach workshops in view camera technique. But over time I found myself moving increasingly toward medium format for things that I used to use LF for. Lenses got better, film got better and I got older.

I then used aHasselblad Arcbodyfor a number of years and found it to be a very versatile system, but in the end I sold it because air travel was becoming too complicated to be able to travel with multiple camera systems.

When I switched to theContax 645system in early 2003 to use with theKodak 16 Megapixel DCS Pro Back, I was enamoured of the entire system and its Zeiss lenses, but I frequently find myself doing landscape work where I needed movements. The Arcbody was gone, and I couldn’t turn to the T/S lenses on the Canon because I usually travel with either one system or the other.

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Browsing The Web

One day while browsing onebaylooking for a deal on some Contax accessories, I came across a listing for theHartblei Super-Rotator. At $995 this seemed too good to be true. A lens that would do just about everything that I wanted at a price similar to what Canon sells its T/S lenses for, and at less than half the price of a Contax Zeiss lens of the same focal length, even without movements.

I did some research but found that that there really wasn’t much in the way of informed and reliable commentary available about this specific lens. If I were to buy one I would be taking a risk, with little recourse. I might end up with the bottom of a pop bottle mounted inside of a tin can, or just maybe, a worthwhile lens that would do what I was looking for.

Being something of a risk taker I contacted the company via e-mail, asked a few questions, and putting my trust in the photography gods placed my order online. I was told that delivery would take about 2 weeks; I paid extra for FedEx delivery, and then sat back and waited. Ten days later FedEx knocked on my door with a package delivered directly from the factory in Kiev in the Ukraine.

No fancy packaging, just a rugged Styrofoam container inside of which was a lens case, with strap, and inside of that the lens, a front lens cap and an English language manual. No rear lens cap though. A certificate of inspection including a 1 year factory warranty on parts and labour was also included.


Fig. 3
Vertical Forest — Salt Point, CA. November, 2003

Contax 645 with Hartblei 45mm f/3.5 f.3.5 Super-Rotator lens
and Kodak DCS Pro Back at ISO 100

Out of The Box

Two things immediately impressed me. Taking off the front lens cap I saw that the lens elements were beautifully multicoated. They had that greenish tinge that one sees on some Zeiss and Pentax lenses, and which have to me always promised superior resistance to flare.

The second impression was — if this is how they build lenses in the Ukraine, then there are places in the Far East that should start to get nervous. No, the quality of craftsmanship was not quite up to Contax / Zeiss standards, and Schneider and Rollei aren’t going to loose too much sleep over it. But my tests and initial field use show that this lens is easily the equal of mainstream optics from any number of well-regarded European and Asian lens makers. Indeed the lens is completely made of metal. No plastics whatsoever, something that can’t be said for too many lenses these days.

Putting the lens on my Contax 645 I opened the diaphragm, looked though the viewfinder and turned the wide gripable focusing ring. Focusing was very smooth, with just the right amount of resistance, and no binding. All of the engraving (yes real engraving, not just paint), was clear, readable and comprehensive. The lens put me into a bit of a time warp, because in many ways it felt like a quality lens from the 1960’s — from when hand labour wasn’t the biggest cost component in manufacture, and when most consumer goods weren’t simply built to a price.

I sat down with the manual next and began to make sense of the multitude of knobs and levers that abound. At first it was confusing, but within 10 minutes I had it figured out.

The mechanical design is very clever. Cleverer in fact than that on the Canon T/S lenses, on which you can not change the orientation of the two axes without sending the lens back to a service center.

On theSuper-Rotatorthe lens actually has two completely separate axes of rotation, each of which can be moved through 360 degrees. What this means is that you can shift the lens to the right, or by releasing the front rotation ring rotate it 180 degrees and then shift it to the left. If you rotate the front rotation ring to 90 or 270 degrees you then have the view camera equivalent of a rising or a falling front. There are positive click stops every 15 degrees for all movements. 12 millimeters of shift is available in every direction.

Further in on the lens barrel there is a second rotation ring. With it in its top or “O” position there is a knurled knob that provides up to 8 degrees of tilt in any direction. Rotate the rear ring to 180 degrees and the tilt now moves upwards instead of downwards. Similarly you can set the angle of rotation on both the front and rear knobs to any angle within a 360 degree range, not just at the predetermined (and marked) click stops.

Because these two rotation rings and the tilt knob are completely independent of each other there is no limitation on combining tilts and shifts in any orientation. Nice!

In The Field

The lens arrived just a few days before a shoot I had scheduled along the California coast, and so I was able to dive right in to a real-world shooting situation. I made several hundred frames over a 5 day period on my Contax 645, with both my Kodak 16 MP digital back and also a 645 film back. Here is a quick evaluation of the critical aspects of this lens’ performance:

Resolution:I was using theHartblei Super-Rotatoralongside my four Zeiss lenses. Though I haven’t done any resolution charts, when critically examining prints, and also on-screen images at 100% magnification, I can’t tell the Hartblei frames from the Zeiss frames when it comes to resolving power. Test charts may show otherwise, but not field work — at least so far.

Flare:In Fig. 3 above I was shooting directly into the sun. I took the same shot at the same time with a Zeiss Distagon 35mm /3.5 lens and can see no difference in the amount of flare or contrast degradation.

Vignetting:On the Kodak back with its reduced frame I can see no vignetting, even at extreme movements. On film, as long as one stays within the suggested shift range there is also no appreciable vignetting. As with all T/S lenses, it is important though to use the lens stopped down to minimize any possability of vignetting.

Digital Chromatic Aberration:I had read that the Kodak medium format digital backs are susceptible to a form of chromatic aberration when used with tilt / shift lenses, because the fitted IR filter has diachronic elements that can scrozzle (a scientific term) the image. I twisted the Super-Rotator every which-way on dozens of different frames, and can not see any evidence of this. Another myth bites the dust.

Ease of Use:This isn’t a terribly large lens and it has at least six different control rings, knobs and levers. Sometimes, depending on the lens’ positioning, it can get a bit tight to reach some controls. The levers that release the rotating segments are also appropriately stiff, to avoid accidental actuation, and so it takes some concentration to be sure that the right one is being turned in the right direction. No real complaints, though occasionally I found that I would accidentally move the focusing ring and would have to re-check focus.

Conclusion

Does it sound as if I’m enthusiastic about this lens? Yes, and with good reason. If the Super-Rotator cost $3,000 rather than $1,000, and if it had the Zeiss or Schneider name on it rather than Hartblei, no one would be surprised at such a positive review. But there will be those that say —no way! How can this (relatively) inexpensive lens from an unknown company in the Ukraine, of all places, be that good?

Well, I’m here to tell you that it is. If you use a Mamiya, Pentax or Contax 645 camera and if you do landscape, architectural or product photography, theHartblei 45mm f/3.5 Super-Rotatormay be one of the great bargain lenses to be found. No distributors, no retailers, no advertising — all of which add to a product’s final cost. Just the factory straight to you.

A live field report on the Super-Rotator will be featured
in an upcoming edition ofThe Luminous Landscape Video Journal.

Среднеформатный фотообъектив MC Hartblei 45/3.5 Super-Rotator Tilt/Shift для Pentax 645

–>До конца торгов:Лот размещен:02/02/2020 20:34:33Окончание торгов:04/02/2020 01:19:58Лот находится в городе:Москва (Россия)

Доставка:
по городу:Самовывоз.
по стране и миру:В другой город не пересылается.
Оплата: Наличные.
Состояние товара:Б/у.
Дополнительно:Байонет: Pentax 645, Тип объектива: Широкоугольный, Фокусное расстояние: Постоянное, Автоматическая фокусировка: Нет
0
№92973525

Подробное описание

Пожалуйста, перед размещением ставки внимательно прочитайте следующие условия. Если вы сделали ставку, то считается, что вы полностью ознакомились с приведёнными ниже условиями и согласились с ними.

Данный лот продаётся “как есть”, без каких-либо гарантий, обмена или возврата. Претензии после продажи не принимаются. Любые уточняющие вопросы приветствуются, постараюсь ответить на них максимально подробно. Если у вас есть вопросы по состоянию, комплектности, характеристикам продаваемого лота, условиям покупкипожалуйста, задавайте их перед размещением ставки.

Я стараюсь максимально точно описывать каждый лот, но если вы обнаружили ошибку или неточность в описании – буду признателен за информацию.

Вы получаете именно то (и в той комплектации), что изображено на фото, если это не оговорено особо в описании лота.

Пересыла в другой город или доставки по городу нет ни при каких обстоятельствах, оплата только наличными, при передаче лота покупателю. Самовывоз с Дмитровского проезда (м. Дмитровская) в рабочие дни. Ваша ставка является окончательной, торга после завершения аукциона нет.

Предложения продать по стартовой цене до завершения аукциона не интересуют.

Покупатель первым выходит на связь в течение 3 (трёх) суток после окончания торгов. Полная оплата лота должна быть произведена не позже 5 (пяти) суток после завершения торгов.
В случае, если покупатель в течение 3 (трёх) суток не выходит на связь или в течение 5 (пяти) суток не оплачивает лот – оставляю за собой право отправить ему отрицательный отзыв (для возврата комиссионных) и перевыставить невыкупленный лот на новые торги.
Надеюсь на ваше понимание. Спасибо.

Описание лота

Неавтофокусный среднеформатный объектив MC Hartblei 45/3.5 Super-Rotator Tilt/Shift под байонет PENTAX 645 в очень хорошем состоянии.

(В продаже есть объективы под байонет Pentax 645 AF, смотрите другие мои объявления.)

В комплекте лота сам объектив Hartblei 45/3.5 Super-Rotator Tilt/Shift под байонет PENTAX 645, оригинальная бленда к объективу, передняя и задняя крышки, чехол. На корпусе объектива есть незначительные потёртости от бленды в транспортном положении (см. фото).

Отличительные особенности:

Данный объектив предназначен для творческой художественной фотографии (в первую очередь – пейзажной и архитектурной). Он позволяет управлять перспективой с возможностью наклона плоскости фокусировки и сдвига изображения.

Предназначен для среднеформатных зеркальных фотоаппаратов с байонетом типа PENTAX 645 (645, 645N, 645NII, 645D, 645Z). За счет применения многослойного просветления объектив устойчив к контровому и боковому освещению.

Характеристики (в соответствии с описанием фирмы-производителя):

Тип: неавтофокусный объектив под байонет PENTAX 645.
Светосила (максимальное значение диафрагмы): f/3,5.
Минимальное значение диафрагмы: f/22.
Фокусное расстояние: 45 мм.
Установка значения диафрагмы ручная, диафрагма 12-лепестковая.
Минимальная дистанция фокусировки: 35 см.
Многослойное просветляющее покрытие Multi Coating (MC) оптических элементов.
Диаметр резьбы под светофильтры: 82 мм.
Масса: 880 г.
Масса с крышками, блендой в чехле: 1035 г.
Длина: 110 мм.

#IMG1# #IMG2# #IMG3# #IMG4# #IMG5#

БЛАГОДАРЮ ЗА ВНИМАНИЕ К ЭТОМУ И ДРУГИМ МОИМ ЛОТАМ!

Пожалуйста, перед размещением ставки внимательно прочитайте следующие условия. Если вы сделали ставку, то считается, что вы полностью ознакомились с приведёнными ниже условиями и согласились с ними.

Данный лот продаётся “как есть”, без каких-либо гарантий, обмена или возврата. Претензии после продажи не принимаются. Любые уточняющие вопросы приветствуются, постараюсь ответить на них максимально подробно. Если у вас есть вопросы по состоянию, комплектности, характеристикам продаваемого лота, условиям покупкипожалуйста, задавайте их перед размещением ставки.

Я стараюсь максимально точно описывать каждый лот, но если вы обнаружили ошибку или неточность в описании – буду признателен за информацию.

Вы получаете именно то (и в той комплектации), что изображено на фото, если это не оговорено особо в описании лота.

Пересыла в другой город или доставки по городу нет ни при каких обстоятельствах, оплата только наличными, при передаче лота покупателю. Самовывоз с Дмитровского проезда (м. Дмитровская) в рабочие дни. Ваша ставка является окончательной, торга после завершения аукциона нет.

Предложения продать по стартовой цене до завершения аукциона не интересуют.

Покупатель первым выходит на связь в течение 3 (трёх) суток после окончания торгов. Полная оплата лота должна быть произведена не позже 5 (пяти) суток после завершения торгов.
В случае, если покупатель в течение 3 (трёх) суток не выходит на связь или в течение 5 (пяти) суток не оплачивает лот – оставляю за собой право отправить ему отрицательный отзыв (для возврата комиссионных) и перевыставить невыкупленный лот на новые торги.
Надеюсь на ваше понимание. Спасибо.

Описание лота

Неавтофокусный среднеформатный объектив MC Hartblei 45/3.5 Super-Rotator Tilt/Shift под байонет PENTAX 645 в очень хорошем состоянии.

(В продаже есть объективы под байонет Pentax 645 AF, смотрите другие мои объявления.)

В комплекте лота сам объектив Hartblei 45/3.5 Super-Rotator Tilt/Shift под байонет PENTAX 645, оригинальная бленда к объективу, передняя и задняя крышки, чехол. На корпусе объектива есть незначительные потёртости от бленды в транспортном положении (см. фото).

Отличительные особенности:

Данный объектив предназначен для творческой художественной фотографии (в первую очередь – пейзажной и архитектурной). Он позволяет управлять перспективой с возможностью наклона плоскости фокусировки и сдвига изображения.

Предназначен для среднеформатных зеркальных фотоаппаратов с байонетом типа PENTAX 645 (645, 645N, 645NII, 645D, 645Z). За счет применения многослойного просветления объектив устойчив к контровому и боковому освещению.

Характеристики (в соответствии с описанием фирмы-производителя):

Тип: неавтофокусный объектив под байонет PENTAX 645.
Светосила (максимальное значение диафрагмы): f/3,5.
Минимальное значение диафрагмы: f/22.
Фокусное расстояние: 45 мм.
Установка значения диафрагмы ручная, диафрагма 12-лепестковая.
Минимальная дистанция фокусировки: 35 см.
Многослойное просветляющее покрытие Multi Coating (MC) оптических элементов.
Диаметр резьбы под светофильтры: 82 мм.
Масса: 880 г.
Масса с крышками, блендой в чехле: 1035 г.
Длина: 110 мм.

Tilt Shift Lens Review: Hartblei 35 Super Rotator

Hartblei 35mm Super Rotator f2.8

The Hartblei 35mm Super Rotator lens has recently been introduced to the US through Kiev Camera and sells for $500. By comparison the Canon TS-E lenses are about $1100. The main attraction and unusual feature to this tilt/shift lens is that the tilt axis and shift axis are not coupled, and can be freely rotated in relationship to one another. This is a very qualitative review covering the description of the lens, how it works, and examples of the image quality relative to other Canon lenses. I have borrowed a friend’s Canon 24 TS-E for the purposes of comparison to another, more expensive tilt/shift lens. The Hartblei is available in Nikon or Canon mounting rings, is 10 cm tall and 8.5 cm in diameter. The glass elements are actually a bit smaller in diameter than the Canon 24 TS-E, but the aperture is a wide f2.8. The Hartblei is just a little bit heavier than the 24 TS-E, but not very much, the Canon have a pretty solid tilt/shift mechanism made out of sizeable chunk of solid aluminum.

For these tests I mounted it on a 1DmkII, a 1.3X crop sensor with RRS L bracket and Angle Finder C at 2.5X to aid in manual focus with a split screen focusing screen (Canon Ec-B). These focusing aids are a tremendous help in focusing as otherwise it is very difficult to discern optimum focus. Here is a picture of it with the camera on a Gitzo Explorer tripod, mounted to get a low perspective view of the deck: 6 degree tilt at 10-11 inches off the deck surface.

Here is the shot taken by this set up on a very rainy day, at reduced but larger size, f/11
http://www.fototime.com/FE33C0CFF29BF71/orig.jpg

and the same shot with a Canon 24-70L f2.8 lens at 35mm to demonstrate the added dof of the tilt feature on the Hartblei
http://www.fototime.com/073C7402E19C1E8/orig.jpg

with the Canon lens at f/11 the flowers of the middle orchid are sharp, but the pine needles on the near deck are not.

The Movements of the Hartblei Super Rotator design

Here are some close ups of the lens tilted 8 degrees downwards and shifted a maximum 10mm so you can easily see the movements.

The 4 adjustment rings on the lens all are different size and different textures so it is easy to tell them apart by feel when you are looking through the viewfinder. The focus ring is the big one with circular scallops on it near the outside of the lens. In these images the blue numbers are the feet scale, while on the other side of the lens are yellow numbers for the meters scale. The action of focus ring is really nice a smooth and very easy to fine adjust. The focus travel is quite far, but most of it covers a very small range near the closest focusing distance and the useful range from 2 meters to infinity is a very small travel. Overall I very much liked the action of the focus ring. On the second lens photo above you can see the DOF ring printed in yellow and the aperture ring on the inside of it in white. There are slight one stop indents from f2.8 to 22; it is very easy to move this ring by accident while you are messing with the tilt and shift adjustments.

Next come two rings with white lettering that say SHIFT is numbered 1-10 mm, and the ring closest to the camera that says TILT numbered in degrees 1-8 with small indents. These two rings obviously control the amount of Shift and Tilt. On mine the shift is quite stiff the last 2 mm of travel from 8 to 10mm, but the scalloped ring gives something to hold on to and twist. You can put screw on handles on to the Tilt and Shift rings to make it easer to turn them. I have put one on the tilt ring as it has no textured surface to grab hold of. You can see this knurled, thin handle near the bottom of the lens on the first shot with the tripod and at the bottom of the middle image. They stick out so much it makes the lens bulky to store so I only use one.

Here is the confusing part. See the silver tab on the top of the lens (at the 7 degree mark on the tilt ring) and the black tab between the shift and tilt rings? To change the tilt angle one pushes in the silver tab and freely rotates the entire lens. This disengages a spring loaded tab and allows the entire lens assembly to freely rotate in either direction 360 degrees. There are 18 stop tabs, in other words 20 degrees each. Thus one can move the tilt angle 0, 20, 40, 60, 80, 100, 120, 160, 180, etc. but not 90 degrees. Kind of odd, but usually the tilt axis is not very sensitive, I doubt if one could tell 80 from 100 degrees with the modest 8 degrees tilt max. When you rotate the tilt axis, the shift axis (the front of the lens) will rotate with it. The red dot in front of the silver tab in the last image is the index mark for the tilt, 8 degrees in this image. It is not normally seen as it is covered up by the lens at 0 tilt (the lens is tilted downwards here).
Please continue to part 2

Now in the pics you can see the black tab just behind the shift ring, press that and hold it in and you can freely rotate the shift axis either direction 360 degrees (and beyond). There are 16 tabbed stops or every 22.5 degrees. Thus relative to the tilt one can rotate the shift axis 22.5, 45, 67.5, 90, 112.5, 135, 157.5, 180, etc degrees. Now turn the shift knob to dial in the amount of shift you want, 1-10 mm. It only shifts one direction; outwards, or wherever you have aligned outwards to be. If you want to shift the same amount (say 10mm) in both directions, you have to rotate the shift assembly 180 degrees for the next shot. The shift mechanism only shifts one way, so a 180 degree rotation of the shift axis is needed to shift both left and right (or up and down). The shift angle rotation is relative to the tilt axis, while the tilt angle axis is relative to the camera axis in landscape mode. There are red dots to line up the tilt and shift axis relative to the camera. Here is photo of the bottom of the lens showing the tilt rotation stops, and the lens shifted 10mm, and the knurled handle near the tilt locking tab.

Notice how far over the lens is at 10mm shift! What if you really want to set the tilt angle at exactly 90 degrees relative to the camera body in landscape orientation and not 80 or 100? In the image above you can see the EF lens mount ring is attached to the lens with 4 tiny screws. You can undo the 4 screws, and underneath you’ll find there’s a second set of holes, so you can put the mount back on at 10 degrees rotation to the original position. Thus you can set it up either to get 20 degree tilt detents including exactly horizontal, or get 20 degree detents including exactly vertical, but not both horizontal and vertical at the same time. Why isn’t the tilt axis tabbed for 16 stops of 22.5 degrees like the shift?

Because the shift and tilt portions of the lens freely rotate with respect to each other and the camera body, there is no electrical connection for aperture like in the Canon TS-E lenses. In fact there is no electrical connection from the lens to the camera at all. With the Hartblei the camera doesn’t even know it has a lens on it, so everything is totally manual. Wires would tether both the tilt and shift rotations as it does in the Canon TS-E, limiting total lens rotation (both axes together) to 180 degrees. Even the EXIF is manual, as I used the voice annotation feature on the 1DmkII after each shot to document what lens, tilt setting, shift setting and f-stop were used.

Shift Performance, 3 shot stitch

One of the big advantages of a shift lens is that it is possible to take 3 shot panos without parallax error and without pano stitching software. Using rotation about a nodal point (or more correctly exit pupil) allows stitching software to construct very large panoramas. Usually some amount of debarreling, small rotations, and alignments are used by the pano software to correct for perspective distortion and nodal alignment. However using the technique of moving the camera in the equal and opposite direction of the lens shift, has the effect of keeping the lens in the same exact place and shifting the sensor around to capture the larger image circle projected by the shift lens. One simply aligns the images without any corrections (flat stitching). Look at the last image in this tutorial, this camera L bracket movement is what was done in this test:
http://www.outbackphoto.com/workflow/wf_58/essay.html

Here is a shot off of my deck with variable cloud cover. I focused on the bare tree in the center using the Angle finder C with split prism focusing screen. The 1DmkII was on ISO 200 at 1/250 sec in manual mode with the Hartblei at f/11. This image was captured in RAW, but the others in this review were shot in JPEG Large. I took the first centered shot, shifted the lens 10mm to the left and moved the camera 10mm to the right. Took the second shot at the same camera settings, then shifted the lens 10mm to the right by rotating the shift ring180 degrees trying not to jiggle the camera or touch the focusing ring. To compensate, the camera was shifted 10 mm to the left of center and took the 3rd shot. For these camera movements I used a RRS L bracket where I made a centerline mark. I centered on the bubble spirit level of the RRS lever clamp and used that to measure the 10mm camera shifts. This RRS lever clamp is a big help because when half open, the camera plate can slide back and forth for this 10mm positional adjustment to either side. Here is the flat stitch; I was not at all picky about the overlap, so it’s not perfect and there was a bit of wind which may cause some additional blur in the seams.

HARTBLEI Digital 45mm Super-Rotator Tilt Shift Lens Medium Format

Главные примечания
Широкоугольный фотографический объектив среднего формата MC TS-PC HARTBLEI 45 мм / f = 3,5 Super-Rotator был разработан для профессиональных фотографов.
Hartblei ™ Tilt-Shift Lens Super-Rotator® был разработан по требованию как фотографов, так и режиссеров, что дает возможность поворачивать направления наклона на 8 ° (с шагом в 1 градус) и смещения на 12 мм независимо друг от друга.
Hartblei ™ Super-Rotator® обладает многими качествами, которые необходимы для коммерческих, научных и промышленных фотографических работ. Поскольку Hartblei ™ Super-Rotator® изначально был разработан для систем среднего формата, предоставленный круг изображения намного больше, чем у полнокадрового датчика (24×36 мм).
В соответствии с вашими потребностями у вас есть большой выбор приложений, таких как
• Перспективная коррекция или искажение
• Архитектурное оформление
• Внутреннее оформление
• Макросъемка
• Коммерческое видео
• Панорамное изображение (36 мм (размер сенсора) + 12 мм * 2 (сдвиг вправо / влево) = размер изображения 60 мм)

Кроме того, Hartblei ™ Super-Rotator® дает возможность делать снимки или видео в условиях, которые, как правило, не подходят для обычной фотографии, например, в узких местах и нежелательных отражениях, т.е. появление отражения фотографического оборудования в зеркале.

Hartblei ™ Super-Rotator® имеет 8-линзовую оптическую конструкцию с высококачественным антиотражающим многослойным покрытием и глубоким черным матовым салоном. Цилиндр каждого супер-ротатора Hartblei подбирается индивидуально вместе с указанным креплением объектива для достижения наилучшего результата измерения MTF.

TS-PC Super-Rotator – механизм коррекции перспективы путем наклона и смещения объектива в любом направлении.

Типы
крепления объектива Супер-ротатор объектива TS-PC (Tilt-Shift) изготовлен из Mamiya 645, Contax 645, Pentax 645 и байонета Phase One.

Тип крепления объектива – Mamiya 645, Contax 645, Pentax 645, Phase One .
Формат кадра – 6×6 см (6×4,5 см, 4,5×6 см.
Фокусное расстояние – 45 мм (эквивалентно 24 мм фокусному расстоянию для 35-мм камер).
Фокусировка – Ручная.
Максимальная диафрагма – 1:3.5
Диапазон диафрагмы – 3.5 – 22 (manual)
Конструкция – 8 элементов в 7 группах
Угол обзора – 83 ° (98 ° со смещенным оптическим блоком)
Минимальный фокус – 0.35 m
Размер фильтра – Ø82 mm
Движение объектива – TS-PC Super Rotator, наклон и смещение в любом направлении.
Диапазон сдвига – 0 до 12 мм в любом направлении.
Диапазон движения наклона – 0 до 8 ° в любом направлении
Диапазон вращательного движения – 360 °, с ограничителями щелчка каждые 15 °
Размеры – Ø96×110 мм

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